Sociology

Credit Hours: 1

Course Length:  2 Semesters

Semester 1

Course Description

Sociology is much more than conducting surveys or analyzing census data. Sociology is all about studying people and the groups they are part of. Sociology examines social trends and cultural changes. It involves asking questions and solving problems. Questions such as, what causes social inequalities, poverty, racism, or sexism. In Sociology A the student will be introduced to the origins, research methods, and the work of sociologists. Sociology is sometimes thought to be people conducting surveys or interviewing various members of a neighborhood to learn more about their lives. Some think it is simply people analyzing census data. These things are important, but the study of sociology includes much more. Sociology is all about studying people and the groups they are a part of, as well as studying social trends and cultural changes. Studying sociology also means looking at why things are the way they are, and the relationship between humans and the world around them. Sociology involves asking questions and solving problems. Sociologists are mainly interested in the scientific study of social inequalities-like poverty, delinquency, racism, and sexism-and their implications for public policy.

Course Prerequisites

None

Required Textbook(s) and/or Materials

None

Major Concepts

  • Origins of Sociology
  • Process of Socialization
  • Deviance and Social Stratification
  • Minority Groups and Social Inequalities
  • Gender and Age-Group Inequalities
  • Sociological Research and Public Policy

Semester 2

Course Description

Everyone belongs to one or more groups, and the groups we belong to influence the way we think, feel, and act. The study of sociology gives us tools to define and understand social groups. With those tools, the student will learn how social groups affect our beliefs and actions, and how their members interact with each other. The emphasis in Sociology B is on learning about social institutions and social change with an emphasis on understanding groups in contemporary American society. Sociologists study topics as diverse as crime, class systems, race and gender relations, education, religion, and sports, just to name a few. Studying sociology will allow the student to relate their personal events to events in society. By doing this, the student will learn how social forces affect them every day.

Course Prerequisites

None

Required Textbook(s) and/or Materials

None

Major Concepts

  • Social Change and Collective Behavior
  • Population and Urbanization
  • Family and Education
  • Sports
  • Religion
  • Political and Economic Institutions