Chemistry Honors

Credit Hours: 1.0

Course Length: 2 Semesters

Semester 1

Course Description

Chemistry is involved in almost all other scientific endeavors. Luckily, chemical theory in recent years has become a science in which theory and observation correlate extremely well. The Periodic Table of the Elements, for example, is based not only upon observation, but is firmly attached to quantum mechanics and atomic theory. The goal of this honors course is to establish the tools of the chemist and acquaint you with the theories that predict and explain chemical events. You will have extra practice in computation, a video guide to the most commonly used elements, and study guides to focus your attention on the most relevant content. In addition, you will have a more complete laboratory experience related to the concepts taught in the lessons. The aim is to give you the tools necessary to use chemistry in all other scientific and problem-solving areas. In this first course, the emphasis will be on atomic and molecular interactions including atomic theory, reactions and equations, the mole concept and quantitative chemistry, gas laws, and solutions and colligative properties.

Course Prerequisites

  • Algebra 1
  • Geometry

Required Textbook(s) and/or Materials

None

Major Concepts

  • The Nature of Matter
  • The Interaction of Atoms
  • Reactions and Equations
  • Quantitative Chemistry
  • Gases and Solutions
  • Solutions and Concentrations

Semester 2

Course Description

The second part of honors chemistry deals with some of the particular applications of chemical principles, such as acids and bases, electrochemistry, organic and biochemistry. In addition, the energetics of chemical reactions are examined in some detail, extending their application to nuclear reactions. The intent is to give you, the student, a background in the major areas of chemistry, with the intent that you can either apply such knowledge to other sciences or pursue one or more of the areas in greater detail. Organic and biochemistry, for example, contain a lifetime of material for study, all based upon the simple covalent nature of the carbon bond. Energetics, of course, apply to all reactions, and the principles of thermochemistry give insight into all changes. So continue on, building a foundation for a lifetime of discovery.

Course Prerequisites

  • Algebra 1
  • Geometry

Required Textbook(s) and/or Materials

None

Major Concepts

  • Acids and Bases
  • Energetics and Thermodynamics
  • Redox and Electrochemistry
  • making the Atom Work
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Biochemistry