American History

Credit Hours: 1.0

Course Length: 2 Semesters

Semester 1: Creation of a Nation

Course Description

This course covers the discovery, development, and growth of the United States. Major topics include; American Indian cultures, European colonization of the Americas, and the causes and effects of the American Revolution. Geographical, economic, and political factors are explores as the key factors in the growth of the United States of America. American History I is a survey of the struggle to build the United States of America from the colonial period to the beginning of the twentieth century. By means of reading, analyzing, and applying historical data, students come to appreciate the forces that shaped our history and character as an American people. Not only are the topics of American history discussed, but students also explore research methods and determine accurate sources of data from the past. Knowing the facts and dates of history are just the beginning: each student must understand how history affects him or her.

Course Prerequisites

World History

Required Textbook(s) and/or Materials

None

Major Concepts

  • Process of Independence
  • Constitutional Government
  • Industrialism and Slavery
  • Civil War
  • Westward Expansion
  • Post-Civil War Issues

Semester 2: Expansion of a Nation

Course Description

American History B begins with a study of American life before the 1929 Stock Market crash and how the Roaring Twenties influenced society in the late 19th through early 20th centuries. Students will examine the causes and consequences of the Great Depression and move on into a detailed study of World War II with an emphasis on America’s role in the conflict. The course continues with an analysis of the Cold War struggle and America’s rise as a superpower. The Civil Rights and Women’s rights movements, pollution and the environment, and American domestic and foreign policy will be examined. The course wraps up with a summary of current events and issues, including a study of the Middle East. This course begins with an assessment of life in United States pre-World War I and ends with the conflicts of the new millennium. Students look at the nation in terms of economic, social, and political trends. The experiences of the last century are summarized, including a look into the civil rights issues that have embroiled the nation in conflict. The development of the United States of America into a superpower is explored within a global context.

Course Prerequisites

World History

Required Textbook(s) and/or Materials

None

Major Concepts

  • Industrialization
  • The Great Depression
  • World War II
  • Civil Rights
  • American Domestic and Foreign Policy
  • Global Issues
  • Current Events